BioMoti and CRO partner Pharmidex receive grant to advance cancer candidate

By Melissa Fassbender contact

- Last updated on GMT

(Image: Getty/Alex011973)
(Image: Getty/Alex011973)
BioMoti and Pharmidex have received funding to advance proof-of-concept precision medicine studies – which if successful, could help secure pharma partnerships or additional investment, says BioMoti CEO.

BioMoti, Pharmidex, and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have been awarded a £662,222 ($879,497.04) grant by the UK’s innovation agency, Innovate UK, to support preclinical studies of new therapeutic approaches for hard-to-treat tumors.

Preclinical drug development services will be supported by Pharmidex, a contract research organization (CRO) that BioMoti has worked with over the past seven years, Dr. Davidson Ateh, BioMoti CEO told Outsourcing-Pharma.com.

The two-year program will focus on BMT101 – BioMoti’s lead Oncojan-based ovarian cancer candidate. The company describes Oncojans as a new class of therapeutic microparticles “that target and gain entry to the interior of cancer cells.​”

As part of the program, the companies will study immunomodulation and efficacy in immunocompetent models including HGSC (ovarian), TNBC (breast) and PDA (pancreatic), in addition to patient-derived xenograft models, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and early toxicology.

The funding will also be used to advance pilot studies with undisclosed candidates and to establish a research-scale manufacturing facility. “These are key data sets that should be helpful to enable us to secure pharma partnerships or follow-on investment," ​Ateh explained.

Pharmidex also aims to develop its drug delivery technologies to help accelerate drug discovery and development processes, he said. “Successful studies could lead the way to co-marketing our platform as a research service to existing Pharmidex clients."

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